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Comment: Corrected an error in the timeouts example.

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  • Windows forced-runtime for unattended wake
  • MediaPortal's pre-wakeup time
  • MediaPortal's pre-no-standby time
  • Windows sleep time or hibernation time

When The Windows forced-runtime occurs when your system wakes from sleep or hibernation, Windows makes a distinction between an :

  • An attended wake (caused by user action)

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  • An unattended wake (caused by a wake timer, or by a network event)

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For an unattended wake, Windows forces the system to run for a least 2 minutes. During this time period, Windows prevents the system returning to sleep or hibernation.

The pre-wakeup time has the following effect:

  • If the pre-wakeup time is less than 2 minutes, the recording will start before the Windows forced-runtime expires. When TV Server starts a recording, it prevents the system sleeping or hibernating.  This means that the system will not sleep or hibernate before the recording starts.
  • If the pre-wakeup time is greater than 2 minutes, the system can sleep or hibernate in the interval between the end of the Windows forced-runtime and the start of the recording.  Whether the system actually sleeps or hibernates depends on the other two timeouts.

The pre-no-standby time prevents the system sleeping or hibernating if the interval between the current time and the start of the recording is less than the pre-no-standby time:

  • If the sum of the Windows forced runtime and the pre-no-standby time is greater than the pre-wakeup time, the system will not sleep or hibernate before the recording starts.
  • If the sum of the Windows forced runtime and the pre-no-standby time is less than the pre-wakeup time, there remains a small interval during which the system is eligible to sleep or hibernate before the recording starts.  Whether the system actually sleeps or hibernates depends on the sleep or hibernation time.

The sleep time and the hibernation time are the time intervals that must elapse with no user interaction in order for the system to become eligible to sleep or hibernate:

  • If the sleep time or hibernation time is greater than the pre-wakeup time, the system will not sleep or hibernate before the recording starts.
  • If the sleep time or hibernation time is less than the pre-wakup time, the system can sleep or hibernate in the small interval that exists from the end of the Windows forced runtime plus to the start of the pre-no-standby time, to the start of the recording.

An example will make this clearer: suppose you have defined the following values:

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These values would result in the system being eligible to sleep or hibernate in the interval from 7 3-minute interval between 2 minutes after wake (2 + 5), to 10 to 5 minutes after wake.

Some users like to define a very short sleep or hibernation time, so that the system sleeps or hibernates as soon as a recording has finished. In this situation, the following setting is recommended:

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If your settings satisfy this condition, the value of the sleep or hibernation time will not cause the system to sleep or hibernate before the recording starts, and you can use a very small value sleep or hibernation time if you wish.

Changelog

Change

Date

Release

Weekend standby hours

2014/04/27

1.8.0

Ping Monitor function in PS++ plugin

2014/05/08

1.8.0